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Arabic Dialectology and Applied Linguistics
Edited by : Mohamed Khalil ENNASSIRI
2008 / Issue 2
1

Mohammed Khalil Ennassiri
Introduction

Mahmud El Salman
Variety in Jordanian and Tunisian Dialects: A Comparative Linguistic Study

Mohammed Khalil Ennassiri
Deriving VSO & SVO Structures in Arabic: A Minimalist Perspective

Taoufik El Ayachi
The Syntax of Accusative and Dative Clitics in Arabic and Tamazight

Ikbal Zeddari
A Comparative Study of the Dative Alternation in English and Moroccan Arabic

Sonia El Euch
Decontextualized definitional skills in Arabic, French and English

Mashael Al-Hamly and Mohammed Farghal
Collocations and Colligations in EFL Writing: An Empirical Study

Mohamed Jadir
Discourse Coherence in Functional Grammar (in Arabic)

 
 
Variety in Jordanian and Tunisian Dialects: A Comparative Linguistic Study
pp. 1-20
Mahmud El Salman

Abstract

    This 21st issue of Languages and Linguistics deals with a number of articles that discuss topical issues in syntax, discourse analysis, ELT and sociolinguistics. Thus, El Salmanís paper discusses the [q] variant in two Arabic dialects: the Samakkiyyan dialect in Jordan and the Arabic dialect spoken in Tunis. The study reveals the [q] variant to be prestigious in Jordanian Arabic because it is a Standard Arabic (SA) feature, and in Tunis because it is perceived as an urban variant of Tunisian Arabic. Accordingly, it is argued that the social significance of a variant is not so much derived from the variant itself as from the group that uses that variant. Moreover, the same variant may indeed have two opposite social values in two different societies. 

 
 
Deriving VSO & SVO Structures in Arabic: A Minimalist Perspective
pp. 21-34
Mohammed Khalil Ennassiri

Abstract

    Ennassiriís paper discusses the derivation of VSO and SVO structures in Arabic. The discussion is couched within the Minimalist Programme as outlined in Chomsky (1993), (1994), (1995) and references cited therein. The working hypothesis here is that the N-features of T are weak in Arabic and so do not attract the subject DP to [Spec, TP] for checking purposes. Rather, the DP sitting in [Spec, TP] is merged therein by virtue of the fact that it carries a discourse-related feature called [Top]. The proposed analysis is argued to carry over to Moroccan Arabic and, perhaps, to other VSO languages that allow the SVO order. 

 
 
The Syntax of Accusative and Dative Clitics in Arabic and Tamazight
pp. 35-58
Taoufik El Ayachi

Abstract

    Taoufik El Ayachiís article analyses accusative and dative clitics in Moroccan Arabic (MA) and the Tamazight variety of Berber (TB). The articleís aim is to analyses the nature, distribution and function of these bound elements as well as the nature and the function of the prepositions that support dative clitics in both languages. The last section considers the derivational similarities and the differences between MA and TB in structures involving functional categories such as Neg and WH.

 
  
A Comparative Study of the Dative Alternation in English and Moroccan Arabic
pp. 59-68
Ikbal Zeddari

Abstract

    Zeddariís article compares the dative alternation in English and Moroccan Arabic within Pinkerís (1989) framework. It is argued that while the alternation is driven in both languages by the manner in which dative verbs are represented at the semantic level, the two languages differ with regard to how they delineate dative verbs in a language-particular manner. Apart from the universal Broad Range Rule operative in both languages, Moroccan Arabic turns out to be insensitive to the Narrow Range Rules that constrain the English alternating / non-alternating distinction. This explains the restrictions imposed on double object constructions in Moroccan Arabic

 
 
Decontextualized definitional skills in Arabic, French and English
pp. 69-120
Sonia El Euch

Abstract

    Drawing upon Cumminsí (1981, 2005) interdependence hypothesis, EL Euchís paper addresses two questions, namely whether the proposed interdependence hypothesis holds true with decontextualized definitional skills (DS) and whether this interdependence is more important between closely related languages than between languages that are typologically different. The data were analyzed using ANOVA procedures and Pearson correlations.

 
 
Collocations and Colligations in EFL Writing: An Empirical Study
pp.89-108
Mashael Al-Hamly and Mohammed Farghal

Abstract

    Al-Hamly and Farghalís paper deals with collocations and colligations as concomitant features of foreign language writing. More specifically, it examines such combinations in Kuwait University EFL learnersí essays. The results show the learnersí inappropriate use of collocations and colligations in English, which fact impacts on their writing skill.

 
 
Discourse Coherence in Functional Grammar (in Arabic)
pp. 121-129
Mohamed Jadir

Abstract

    According to Dick (1997) a coherent discourse is one where its constituent parts follow one another in a natural fashion which lends itself to interpretation. Dick (op. cit) mentions a number of elements that bring about this coherence, chief of which are temporal succession, topic succession, focus and coordinating conjunctions. From this perspective, Jadirís article looks at discourse coherence in Arabic from the point of view of Functional Grammar. More specifically, it looks at what it takes to realize the notions of cohesion and coherence in Arabic texts. However, the article argues that there are some texts whose coherence seems to depend primarily on the notions of inference and relevance.